Gaston's White River Resort Nature Trails

American Robin (Turdus migratorius)


Nature Trails Gaston's White River Resort


Manford's Gallery Of Photos
&
Rose Maschek's Gallery Of Photos


A Five Paw Rated Site


American Robin (Turdus migratorius)

Nature Trails Gaston's White River Resort


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Nature Trails Gaston's White River Resort

Nature Trails Gaston's White River Resort

Nature Trails Gaston's White River Resort

Nature Trails Gaston's White River Resort

Nature Trails Gaston's White River Resort

Nature Trails Gaston's White River Resort

Nature Trails Gaston's White River Resort

Nature Trails Gaston's White River Resort

Nature Trails Gaston's White River Resort

Nature Trails Gaston's White River Resort

   

Rose Maschek's Gallery Of Photos
American Robin (Turdus migratorius)

Nature Trails Gaston's White River Resort

Nature Trails Gaston's White River Resort

Nature Trails Gaston's White River Resort

Nature Trails Gaston's White River Resort

Nature Trails Gaston's White River Resort

Nature Trails Gaston's White River Resort

 

 

 

 

Our largest thrush (approximately 10 inches in length), the American Robin is found throughout North America, from extreme northern Canada and as far south as Guatemala. This common and well-known bird is noted for its habit of feeding in lawns where it finds earthworms (by sight, not sound), and for its cheery voice. Robins are often one of the first birds to sing in the morning, singing long choruses of rhythmic paired phrases of two or three syllables that alternately rise and fall in pitch. The dawn singing is reprised at dusk and occasionally throughout the day.

Description: Adults are gray brown above, with a darker head and tail. The bill is bright yellow; the chin and throat are white, with black vertical striping on the throat. Surrounding the dark eye are white orbital markings. The breast is brick red and the belly is white. In most eastern birds the tail has white corners. Females are somewhat more dull in color; the upperparts are lighter and more brown in color; the head is not so black and thus provides less contrast with the back; and the breast is paler, often edged with white.

The common race of robins found throughout most of the West tends to be more pale and lacks the white outer corners of the tail. Robins of the humid Northern Pacific coastal areas and those from Newfoundland tend to be very dark.

Juveniles are dark on top, much like the adult plumage, but the feathers of the back, upper wings, and rump have streaks of white and blackish tips giving the upperparts a speckled appearance. The cinnamon coloring of the breast is overlaid with conspicuous black spots. There is much individual variation in the cinnamon color of the underparts: some juveniles are largely white underneath. This plumage is molted sometime between August and October, depending on when the individual hatched. Both sexes look alike in juvenal plumage.



Copyright Jim Gaston & Rose Maschek 12.2006


Nature Trails Gaston's White River ResortNature Trails Gaston's White River Resort